Year In Brief FY 2018

Year In Brief FY 2018

All corners of Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures were bustling this year.

Inventors

Technology Transfer supported the advancement of an exciting array of ideas and discoveries from across campus. Technologies continue to emerge across a wide range of research – from artificial intelligence to geothermal energy to immunotherapy to digital health, and beyond – further enriching the university’s considerable intellectual property portfolio.

FastForward

FastForward startups had an extraordinary year raising venture capital, and the progress toward bringing these Johns Hopkins discoveries to market made headlines regularly. Students from every corner of Johns Hopkins embrace entrepreneurship through the space, funding and programming available at FastForward U.

Corporate Partnerships

Corporate Partnerships had a banner year and celebrated a number of major collaborations. Corporate partnership agreements continued to help faculty across the university advance their world-renowned research along pathways aimed at real impact via the market.

Here’s to another year of impact on the world, growth of the local innovation ecosystem, and momentum to leverage in the year to come!  

Impact Assets corporate partnerships Student Entrepreneurship Milestones

Down


Impact

Over the past five years, JHTV has processed 2,492 invention disclosures, secured 718 new patents and 819 new agreements. This year, JHTV’s Technology Transfer group processed 463 invention disclosures, secured 150 new patents and executed 138 new agreements. The office also consulted with dozens of inventors to analyze the market for, plan the development of and secure funding for early stage technologies.

 

463 Invention Disclosures Received 138 Licenses & Options $16.5 Million Licensing Revenue

Tech Transfer Figures

8 Newly Created Startup Companies

• 3Dnamics
Dracen Pharmaceuticals
• Escient Pharmaceuticals
• EtCH
• Healytics
• HIF Therapeutics
• Musina Ventures (Pty) Ltd
• Neuro Motor Innovations

Facts and Figures

Student Startups Receiving Ralph S. O’Connor Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Fund Awards

• Atana
• OtoGlobal Health
• Treyetech
• VersaMaker
• Weel

FastForward Facts and Figures

 

 

 

 


Down

 

 

 

 

Impact

 

SPACE  |  SERVICES  |  FUNDING

To complement the groundbreaking discoveries produced across campus, JHTV supports innovators and entrepreneurs by providing the key ingredients to a robust local innovation ecosystem: space, services and funding.

As an indicator of incredible success this year, FastForward startups raised total venture capital in excess of $451M. Importantly, for the second consecutive year, nearly half of this funding remained in Maryland, a sign of the growing strength of the local ecosystem.

 

 

 

SPACE


Space is a critical element of our growing ecosystem. Physical space anchors good ideas by facilitating the creation of real local businesses that generate economic activity and solve real problems. FastForward this year doubled its footprint, opening a second innovation hub to support commercial tenants adjacent to the Homewood campus at FastForward R. House. Across the street, a new student-focused space, FastForward U Homewood, was open to welcome students at the start of the 2018 fall semester.

FastForward: 1812

FastForward 1812


FastForward 1812 cements East Baltimore as one of our city’s premier innovation districts, providing startups, investors, industry experts and leading academic researchers opportunities to meet, network, collaborate and grow.

The 23,000-square-foot space includes 15,000 square-foot of affordable wet lab space for startups. FastForward 1812 housed 21 startups at the fiscal year’s close.


HUB SPACE Learn more

LAB SPACE Learn more

FastForward: R. House

FastForward R. House


This flexible, subsidized space allows local entrepreneurs–with or without a Johns Hopkins affiliation–to plant business roots in the fertile ground near the Homewood campus.


HUB SPACE Learn more

LAB SPACE Learn more

FastForward: R. House

FastForward U Homewood


Located near Johns Hopkins’ schools of arts & sciences, education, and engineering, FastForward U Homewood houses workshops and resources—including a makerspace managed by the Whiting School of Engineering—that enable students to grow ideas, build ventures and understand business.

STARTUP HUB Learn more

MAKERSPACE Learn more

FastForward U East


Our second student innovation hub, FastForward U East at Rangos is located across from FastForward 1812 and features 3,200 square feet of office, co-working and meeting space. This hub hosts educational programming and provides students opportunities for venture exploration.

FastForward East has the space and amenities startups need to develop their technologies and realize their potential.

AMENITIES Learn more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SERVICES


JHTV supports startups inside and outside Johns Hopkins with education, space, mentorship, services and funding opportunities.

SIL


 

Social Innovation Lab

A mutually-supportive, cohort-based learning model where innovators and entrepreneurs can support each other on their pathway to scaling social ventures that make measurable impacts in Baltimore and beyond.

  • For 2017-18, 10 teams were selected from 84 applications by Baltimore-area residents and JHU students, faculty and staff.
  •  

  • All participants received a $1,000 participation stipend, and ClearMask, which is launching the first full-face transparent surgical mask, was selected by peers to receive the culminating $25,000 cohort prize.

MIR


 

Mentors-in-Residence

Pairs each FastForward member with one or more mentors who have successfully built, sold and invested in startup companies allowing them to share their business and technical expertise with FastForward startups.

  • This year, our 14 mentors devoted 989 hours to 544 engagements.
  •  

  • As an example, a team of mentors recently brought together a Johns Hopkins startup with a Johns Hopkins lab, which together received a $100K grant from the Maryland Energy Innovation Institute for demonstrating efficiency gain in solar cells using state-of-the-art transparent conductor materials.
  •  

  • In another instance, mentors teamed up a Johns Hopkins startup with a Johns Hopkins neurological rehabilitation physician to develop prototype knee brace to quantify a patient’s increased mobility.
  •  

  • Mentors also played a direct role in fundraising; one mentor co-led a seed investment round of $1M and another support valuations for a $15M series A round.

I-Corps


 

NSF’s I-Corps Program

A part of the National Science Foundation’s National Innovation Network, this program is designed to help researchers better understand their target market for innovative new products and services by engaging directly with potential customers.

  • Helps scientists think outside of the lab, develop business plans and perform customer discovery projects.
  •  

  • In 2017-18, JHTV guided 44 teams through the curriculum, and 21 teams each received $2,880 in additional funding support.

 

Trajectory Next


 

Trajectory Next

Funded through the TEDCO Incubation Challenge–a 12-week sales training program for digital health, bio-health and life sciences startups–offers support, guidance and access to the combined networks of JHTV, Betamore and UM Ventures through their respective universities and affiliations.

  • Eight teams participated starting in April 2018.
  •  

  • Provided startups with exposure to prospecting, networking, and sales methods.

The Commercialization Academy


 

The Commercialization Academy

Provides experiential learning opportunities to students interested in academic entrepreneurship and the commercial application of Johns Hopkins technologies. Exposes participations to emerging technologies and commercialization pathways and the curriculum includes networking and career exploration opportunities.

  • Provided career exploration and skill-building experience to 31 Johns Hopkins student interns this year, representing five of the nine schools of the university. Three additional interns joined JHTV from outside institutions for an abbreviated summer experience.
  •  

  • Members of the FY18 cohort have gone on to careers in health care consulting, patent law, startup development – and university commercialization.

Legal/Accounting Support Program


 

Legal/Accounting Support Program

Provided FastForward startups with 48 hours of pro bono legal services and 24 hours of pro bono accounting/tax services from professional sponsors.

  • Ten FastForward companies also received recruiting assistance from the Johns Hopkins University Career Center.

 

Anchor Ventures


 

Anchor Ventures

In partnership with the University of Maryland, this monthly networking series has brought together over 430 members across the local ecosystem. Funded by TEDCO, this program has contributed to the entrepreneurial groundswell in Baltimore by providing a regular gathering space for networking and education.

  • February 2018 kick-off with Steve Case, co-founder of AOL and CEO of Revolution Ventures.
  •  

  • Other recent events highlighted life science investing, the medical device startup journey, talent development in Baltimore, and more.

 

M-Labs


 

M-Labs

In collaboration with Medimmune/AstraZeneca, this FastForward program pairs startups with functional experts to solve critical startup issues through live consultation with industry representatives.

  • Five teams were part of the inaugural cohort, which brought mutual benefit to the industry participants and the startups seeking industry perspective.

 

 

 

Funding


JHTV helps innovators and entrepreneurs to identify funding opportunities that can move ideas forward to market. This includes early translational research funds to support nascent discoveries and young ventures, much of which is made possible through philanthropic commitments. JHTV also helps university startups secure venture funding, with particular success this year in both seed and later stage funding rounds.

 

Venture Success

FastForward startups raised significant venture capital this year, with 31 companies raising a collective $451 million – including 16 raises of $5 million or more. In keeping with JHTV’s commitment to retaining innovation locally, we celebrated that nearly half (47%) of that funding went to Maryland-based companies. To encourage these investments, JHTV actively manages relationships with top venture firms around the world, 16 of which came to campus this year to uncover emerging investment opportunities.

 
 

Cohen Translational Engineering Fund


 

Cohen Translational Engineering Fund

Available to Whiting School of Engineering faculty and made possible by a generous commitment from alumnus Neil Cohen, ’83, and his wife, Sherry, this fund provides critical early funding needed to focus on the first steps of translation.

  • Supports moving research out of the laboratory, including the development of new WSE patents, and a range of critical needs—from materials and supplies to graduate student stipends and tuition.
  •  

  • This year, the Cohen Fund provided $160,000 to help four projects move engineering research into the marketplace.

 

Louis B. Thalheimer Fund for Translational Research


 

Louis B. Thalheimer Fund for Translational Research

Provides seed money to Johns Hopkins faculty members to produce the proof-of-concept, prototype and commercial feasibility studies necessary to bring their discoveries and innovations out of the laboratory and into the world.

  • Parag Karmarker, Dan Stutman and Dr. Jim Wright were awarded $210,000 to produce proof-of-concept, prototype and commercial feasibility studies that will help move their technologies to market.
  •  

  • It was made possible by a $5.4 million gift from businessman and philanthropist Louis Thalheimer, a school of medicine trustee.

 

The Maryland Innovation Initiative


 

The Maryland Innovation Initiative (MII)

A partnership between the State of Maryland and five Maryland academic research institutions designed to promote commercialization of research conducted in the partnership universities and leverage each institution’s strengths.

  • MII awarded just over $2.4 million in grants to 20 Johns Hopkins University teams in fiscal year 2018.
  •  

  • The five Maryland academic research institutions are Johns Hopkins University, Morgan State University, University of Maryland College Park, University of Maryland Baltimore and University of Maryland Baltimore County.

 

Ralph S. O’Connor Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Fund


 

Ralph S. O’Connor Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Fund

Made possible by a generous donation from Ralph O’Connor, a Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences alumnus, and his wife, Becky, this fund supports Johns Hopkins students aiming to solve major challenges through entrepreneurship.

  • Provides selected ventures with up to $10,000 in non-dilutive grant funding.
  •  

  • This year, five student teams were awarded $5,000 with the opportunity to earn up to $5,000 more.

 

Summer Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Award


 

Summer Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Award

Supports one Johns Hopkins undergraduate-led startup each year with grant funding of $10,000 and functions like a paid internship, enabling students to use their summer break from coursework to build a successful company.

  • Selected startup receives mentorship from distinguished Johns Hopkins alumni and support from JHTV, which may include access to office space, mentors and additional business services.
  •  

  • This year’s awardee, Shaap, is a social e-commerce platform led by rising sophomore Eyan Goldman.

 

Bluefield Innovations


 

Bluefield Innovations

A collaboration between Deerfield Management and JHTV designed to support the commercialization of early stage therapeutic research at Johns Hopkins, with additional funding available to advance research showing strong commercial potential.

  • makes $65 million available for research and startup seed capital.
  •  

  • This year, one project was been selected for funding, and another round of applications is under review.

Down

 
 

 

 

 

 

corporate partnerships

JHTV had a record-breaking year in bringing corporate funding into Johns Hopkins labs. These collaborations leverage Hopkins’ areas of excellence and provide research pathways with the potential to dramatically impact society, and in particular human health. Highlights include:

 


AbbVie

AbbVie

Signed in 2016, this oncology collaboration has resulted in six active oncology projects. Beyond the field of oncology, a collaboration in neuroscience has continued into a second year, and exploration of future projects continues.

Bayer

Bayer

In year three of a five-year collaboration, Bayer supported four joint research projects at the Wilmer Eye Institute, as well as work in pharmacokinetics at JHDD to develop therapies for retinal diseases. Two Bayer projects have achieved major pre-clinical development milestones within Bayer, signifying the real potential of these research pathways to achieve commercial success.

Bayer

Bristol-Myers Squibb

This five-year collaboration is focused on immuno-oncology, with sponsored research, clinical trial, and laboratory equipment components. The first tranche of sponsored research projects is underway. In the collaborative spirit of these partnerships, the Corporate Partnerships team facilitated a day-long event to promote dialogue between Johns Hopkins researchers and Bristol-Myers Squibb experts.

Canon

Canon Medical Systems Corporation

In 2017, Canon Medical Systems Corporation placed a state-of-the-art research MRI in the Johns Hopkins Science & Technology Park, at 1812 Ashland Avenue. This advanced machinery has allowed Johns Hopkins faculty to bring in new funding for their research.

Celgene

Celgene

With three other schools, Johns Hopkins participates in the Celgene cancer consortium. Established in FY16, this ten-year consortium funds projects at Johns Hopkins, The University of Pennsylvania, Columbia University and the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in a number of oncology research areas. In FY18, two large projects presented by Johns Hopkins faculty were approved, both focused on the inhibition of cancer through epigenetics.

MedImmune

MedImmune

MedImmune has continued its long-standing collaboration with Johns Hopkins and provided sponsored research funding for five collaborative projects this year, having borne a total of 13 research projects. The Johns Hopkins-MedImmune Scholars program, a first-of-its-kind joint PhD program, entered into its second year and is currently recruiting the next cohort of PhD scholars.

 
 
 
 


Down

 


 
 
 
 

Student Entrepreneurship
FastForward U

 

SPACE  |  PROGRAMMING  |  FUNDING

Entrepreneurial activity among Johns Hopkins students surged this year, with new space, programs and funding made available to steward them on.

 

Tech Transfer Figures

 

 

SPACE


FastForward U operated two spaces this year with a strong presence across campuses.

FastForward U East at Rangos, in the Rangos building on the northeast corner of the East Baltimore campus, provides proximity to students at the schools of medicine, nursing, and public health. This year students made over 600 visits to this space, and 14 hosted events were held.

 

FastForward U East at Rangos FastForward U East at Rangos FastForward U East at Rangos

 

A temporary space for Homewood campus students was established in the Wyman Park building. Students made over 600 visits to this space, which hosted 22 events and provided daily workspace.

Students returning to campus for the 2018 fall semester arrived to find a new permanent co-working and program space, located blocks west of Johns Hopkins’ schools of arts and sciences, education and engineering. FastForward U Homewood will house workshops and resources—including a makerspace managed by the Whiting School of Engineering—that enable students to grow ideas, build ventures and experience business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Programming


FastForward U hosts and co-sponsors educational and social events that build community among students and enhance the campus culture of entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

Hopkins Pitch Night


 

Hopkins Pitch Night

A monthly event that brings together students to hear pitches from three promising student startups, make new connections and build community within the Hopkins entrepreneurial ecosystem.

  • Six Hopkins Pitch Nights were held over the past year.
  •  

  • Events are recorded so that students can review or share their pitches.

 

Introduction to Entrepreneurship


 

Introduction to Entrepreneurship

A new one-hour workshop introduces students to the basic principles of starting a venture – whether a non-profit, a small business or a tech startup.

  • Attendance qualifies students to apply for Spark Grant funding within the same academic year.
  •  

  • Over 100 students participated and 66 workshop attendees went on to apply for a Spark grant.

 

 

FastForward U Friday Office Hours


 

FastForward U Friday Office Hours

Each Friday afternoon, typically from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m., a mentor is made available to students for one-on-one 30 minute sessions. Mentors provide expertise ranging from pitch practice, fundraising, grant writing, team building and social impact.

 

Innovation Conversations


 

Innovation Conversations

Speaker series provides students with access to high-profile entrepreneurs in a fireside-chat style format with a focus on the entrepreneurial journey.

  • Dialogue encouraged to help students gain insight into the successes, failures and insights that define entrepreneurship.
  •  

  • Speakers included Eric Conner (JHU alum, co-founder and CTO of Healthify), Chieh Huang (founder & CEO of Boxed), and Alexis Ohanian (co-founder of Reddit).

 

The FastForward U team also partners across campus with student organizations and school-sponsored programs on events including Medhacks, HopHacks, I-Corps, the Social Innovation Lab, Nest Strategies, TCO Labs, Admissions, and First (and Second) Year Experience.

 

 

 

Funding


Beyond on-campus funding, student startups raised over $8 million in funding this year.

Spark Grants


 

Spark Grants

Launched in spring of 2018, the program provides modest grants designed to enable students to test their ideas, build prototypes or launch pilot projects.

  • Out of 66 applicants, 23 teams were awarded a total of $15,075.
  •  

  • Many teams used funds for the building of prototypes; one team cleverly leveraged this money as a potential multiplier, purchasing tickets to travel to a large national pitch competition.

 

Ralph O’Connor Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Fund


 

Ralph O’Connor Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Fund

Made possible by a generous donation from Ralph O’Connor, a Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences alumnus, and his wife, Becky, this fund supports Johns Hopkins students aiming to solve major challenges through entrepreneurship.

  • Selected from 31 applications, five teams were awarded $50,000.
  •  

  • Past recipients are achieving disruption in a variety of industries including Fractal Tech, a cybersecurity startup that was acquired by in September 2017. A number of other startups are raising seed funding and hiring teams.

 

Summer Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Award


 

Summer Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Award

Supports one Johns Hopkins undergraduate-led startup each year with grant funding of $10,000 and functions like a paid internship, enabling students to use their summer break from coursework to build a successful company.

  • Selected startup receives mentorship from distinguished Johns Hopkins alumni and support from JHTV, which may include access to office space, mentors and additional business services.
  •  

  • Selected from 14 applicants, this year’s awardee, Shaap, is a social e-commerce platform led by rising sophomore Eyan Goldman.

Down

Impact

Each year since the creation of JHTV in 2014, we reach new milestones in the quest to leverage Hopkins’ ideas to improve our local community and the world beyond. This year, we highlight the following accomplishments and moments of recognition on this journey.

Startup Recognition

Startup recognition

  • LifeSprout, Proscia and Sonavex CEOs named BBJ’s 40 Under 40: The publication recognized FactoryFour CEO Param Shah for his work to bring manufacturing into the digital age. Shantell Roberts received recognition for her work through Touching Young Lives which provides safe sleeping spaces for babies. Baltimore Magazine
  • Baltimore Magazine’s list of 30 visionaries who are shaping the city’s future: The publication recognized FactoryFour CEO Param Shah for his work to bring manufacturing into the digital age. Shantell Roberts received recognition for her work through Touching Young Lives which provides safe sleeping spaces for babies.
  • 2 with FastForward ties among those named to BBJ’s Tech 10: Through innovation, investments and talent nurturing, Baltimore’s tech community grows stronger every day. To recognize those most instrumental in driving this change, The Baltimore Business Journal named the recipients of its second annual Tech 10 Awards, including two with ties to FastForward.
  • Founders of 2 Johns Hopkins startups named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30: For the third consecutive year, Forbes has recognized innovators and entrepreneurs with ties to Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures on its exclusive 30 Under 30 list.
  • Personal Genome Diagnostics adds to its IP portfolio: The FastForward startup Personal Genome Diagnostics added to its IP portfolio with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Based in Baltimore’s Canton neighborhood, PGDx expects the license will enable it to develop new kinds of cancer tests.
  • FastForward startup seeks to recycle lost blood lost: Sisu Global Health, a FastForward startup, has made significant progress moving through clinical trials and gaining regulatory approvals for its technology that allows doctors to recycle a patient’s own blood lost through traumatic internal bleeding. Sisu plans to launch its first device for sale online, as well as in Ghana and Kenya.
  • Proscia moves into dermatopathology: Proscia, a startup founded by Johns Hopkins alumni while studying at the university, announced that it signed a first-of-its-kind agreement with one of the largest dermatopathology labs in the country. This move marks an entrance into the dermatopathology market for the company’s AI-powered digital pathology software. Additionally, the company announced it will open an office in Philadelphia to accompany its Baltimore presence.
  • b.well receives national recognition: Not only has b.well Connected Health’s profile risen locally with its participation in M-1 Ventures and relocation to The Grid at the University of Maryland BioPark, the startup has received national recognition. Designing a single place to store and share health records originating from myriad sources, b.well has participated in the Silicon Valley-based Plug and Play program and recently was named to the current cohort of MasterCard’s Start Path program.

Novel innovation

Startup Fundraising Events

For Johns Hopkins startups across industries – Healthcare IT, Robotics, Therapeutics and Medical Devices – it was a lucrative year. Below are some of the fundraising events we celebrated:

  • Personal Genome Diagnostics (PGDx): PGDx had the largest raise of FY18, a Series B round of $75M co-led by new investor Bristol-Myers Squibb and existing investor New Enterprise Associates (NEA). PGDx is growing within Baltimore, having expanded to a Brewer’s Hill location. The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore Business Journal
  • Tissue Analytics: Soon after announcing it would open a satellite office in Kansas City, Tissue Analytics shared that it closed a Series A that brought in $5 million. The company, whose platform uses machine learning and computer vision to segment, classify and measure wounds, intends to make hires to grow its data analytics team. Technical.ly, Baltimore Business Journal
  • Protenus: Shortly after raising $11 million in series B funding, Protenus CEO Nick Culbertson announced that the Baltimore startup plans to nearly double the size of its team. Culbertson said the 30 hires will likely be sourced locally. The FastForward startup analyzes and protects health care data for health systems across the country and saw its revenue grow twentyfold in 2017. Technical.ly
  • Ready Robotics: Ready Robotics enables plug-and-play solutions for robots in an emerging field: robotics-as-a-service, or RaaS. A $15 million Series A round was led by Drive Capital and also included RRE Ventures and Eniac Ventures. Baltimore Business Journal
  • Dracen: In one of the largest Johns Hopkins startup raises this year, Deerfield Management committed $36 million of a $40 million Series A funding round for Dracen Pharmaceuticals. The FastForward startup founded last year is developing a platform of anti-cancer therapies that work as inhibitors of cancer metabolism. Endpoints News, Baltimore Business Journal, Technical.ly
  • WindMIL: Located in JHTV’s FastForward 1812 innovation hub, WindMIL is developing cell therapies based on Marrow Infiltrating Lymphocytes (MILs), with phase 2 trials underway. This year, WindMIL raised $32.5 million in Series B financing led by Qiming Venture Partners USA and with a combination of new and existing investors. Technical.ly
  • Sonavex: This Baltimore-based company’s primary technology, EchoSure, enables clinicians to measure critical intravascular flow metrics to detect post-operative clots prior to morbid and expensive surgical failures. In addition to a raise of $1 million this year, Sonavex was awarded SBIR funding Phase II funding in May 2018 and also received FDA clearance for EchoSure in June. Press Release

Commitment to service

Commitment to service

In an effort to better serve the audiences with whom we regularly engage — primarily faculty members, industry collaborators and investors — we introduced several initiatives designed to make working with JHTV more seamless and to encourage future collaborations.

  • 2-2-2: The Technology Transfer group is responsible to university inventors for ensuring that inventions are appropriately identified, protected, and applied. In keeping with its commitment to serve this function effectively and efficiently, the team seeks to respond to invention disclosures within 2 days, schedule meetings with inventors within 2 weeks, and determine whether to pursue IP protection of the asset within 2 months. This year, the team met an extraordinary standard of responsiveness and efficiency.
  • Inventor Portal: To better serve the institutions’ innovative faculty and researchers, Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures (JHTV) fully transitioned to an online inventor portal on March 1. Among the recognized advantages of the new portal are process efficiency, inventor convenience, accuracy and compliance, and improved customer service.
  • MTA and NDA Process Improvement: MTA and NDA turnaround time in FY18 was the highest in JHTV history. 100% of NDAs were processed within 30 days, and 89% were processed within 5 days. 99% of MTAs were processed in 30 days; 98% were processed within 5 days.

In the news

In the news

  • Johns Hopkins among 100 universities with the most patents in 2017

    Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland, College Park were among the schools to earn the most patents for university-born inventions and technologies last year, according to a ranking by the National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association based on data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Johns Hopkins ranked at No. 7 in 2017, with 164 U.S. utility patents granted JHU has ranked in the top 10 since 2014 when it boasted 140 patents, followed by 143 in 2015 and 167 in 2016. Baltimore Business Journal (subscription required).

  • Johns Hopkins partners with investment management firm to boost early stage research

    Through a partnership with Deerfield Management, a leading life sciences venture capital firm, Johns Hopkins researchers will have access to a new source of research funding. Johns Hopkins and Deerfield have established Bluefield Innovations to fund discovery of drugs that may show promise as a treatment but aren’t yet ready for human trials. The Baltimore Sun

  • Universities, hoping to sway millennials, are now opening innovation hubs for undergraduates

    More and more college students want to build their own businesses, and universities like Johns Hopkins are meeting that demand with space, services and funding opportunities. CNBC

  • Social Innovation Lab alums

    A concept popular in Finland since the 1930s for protecting infants is gaining steam in Baltimore. Shantell Roberts, the CEO of Touching Young Lives, a Social Innovation Lab (SIL) alumnus, is reducing the city’s infant death rate by distributing padded cardboard boxes that provide a safe sleeping space for babies. The Baltimore Sun. Meanwhile, alumnus Brittany Young won the first edition of Boss Up Baltimore. Young was one of seven African American entrepreneurs who pitched their businesses. Through B-360, Young is teaching STEM skills to Baltimore youth using dirt bikes. Technical.ly Young was also named an Echoing Green Fellow.

Down

 
 



Overview Impact Assets corporate partnerships Student Entrepreneurship Milestones


Overview

 
 
 
 

Down

 

 

Thanks to Our Corporate Sponsors

including 6 new sponsors:

Beckman-Coulter, CSC Leasing, Emergent BioSolutions, PNC Bank, SolidWorks, ThermoFisher

 

 
























WP-Backgrounds Lite by InoPlugs Web Design and Juwelier Schönmann 1010 Wien